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 Post subject: MK low D measurements?
PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 4:12 am 
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Hi, my first post here. Trying to get into low whistling, but it's been frustrating so far. I live in Australia, and just had to go through the very expensive (postage) process of sending a whistle back which my small hands with thin fingers couldn't manage, and then British customs demanding money because they thought I was selling it to the whistle shop! So before I buy another one, I want to get the measurements.

I'm thinking about an MK low D. Has anyone bought one new in the past year or so and would have the time to do some measurements. The measurements I need (in mm if possible) are:

- Space between holes 1 and 3, centre to centre.
- Space between holes 4 and 6, centre to centre.
- Diameter of hole 5.

I did ask MK for this info, but they seem to find this a difficult and unusual question. And I know some of these measurements are on the Pipers Grip website, but they're a few years old.

Thanks in advance.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 2:12 pm 
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I used a regular metric measuring tape...distance between 1-3 is 76mm...distance between 4-6 is 75mm...diameter of hole 5 is 10mm...on mine anyway.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 2:54 pm 
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whistle1000 wrote:
I used a regular metric measuring tape...distance between 1-3 is 76mm...distance between 4-6 is 75mm...diameter of hole 5 is 10mm...on mine anyway.

MK Pro, measured with a hard ruler.
distance between 1-3 is 77mm...distance between 4-6 is 76mm...diameter of hole 5 is 11x11mm


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 4:43 pm 
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Between 1 and 3 is 77mm. Between 4 and 6 is 75mm. Number 5 hole is 11mm.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 5:01 pm 
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Wow! That's the fastest, most helpful set of replies I have ever received from a forum post! Gold medal guys, thanks!

That's great news too. Those numbers come in right about the comfortable limits for my hands both in stretch and closing hole 5 (around 2mm smaller than the whistle I had to return). The whole idea for me is to get the most freely blowing, most expansive sound within the limits of my hands, and it looks like the MK hits the sweet spot.

Many, many thanks! :D


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 8:01 pm 
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The people on this site are absolute gems!! You'll always receive any help requested....As for freely blowing whistles, MK's have quite a bit of back pressure and are not that free blowing...I was kinda shocked the first time I tried one...It was so different from my Copeland which is incredibly free blowing... Wasn't bother though as I liked the back pressure...Enough so that I traded my Copeland for an MK low D and F and am delighted to have done so....You would not be disappointed with an MK....Welcome to the forum!!


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 9:35 pm 
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Thanks for the clarification on the MK, W1000. I think in my newbieness I'm a bit loose with my descriptions. By "freely blowing", what I meant was being able to give it a good blow - as against a whistle that shoots into higher octaves easily. Backpressure is fine. One of my reasons for taking up low whistling is to exercise my somewhat bronchitic lungs...

Only problem now is that MK is currently out of stock of green low Ds - I do have to have a green one! I've put my name down on the notification list for when stock is available. From all reports, it does indeed seem I'm unlikely to be disappointed when I eventually get one. I look forward to posting questions about how to actually play it! :)


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:40 am 
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To me, talk of backpressure doesn't mean much. It's not something I'm aware of, nor something I evaluate when testing whistles.

What I'm very much aware of is the power/volume/strength of the low notes and the ease/sweetness/facility of the high notes. Usually just playing Bottom D, Low E, and High B will tell all that needs to be told in this regard.

I also want an efficient whistle. You can have a Low D whistle where, on High B (for example) twice as much air passes through the instrument as on another Low D. This means you can only hold a note for half as long. I can't play airs the way I want to on an inefficient whistle like that.

MKs are superb whistles in many ways. They're loud enough to work in a session. They have a wonderful unique tone. Their finger-hole sizing and spacing makes them more ergonomic than many other Low Ds. They have a lighter/sweeter/easier 2nd octave than many other Low Ds. They're one of the most air-efficient Low Ds. They're really a delight to play. (In full disclosure I should say that I've owned a half-dozen different MK Low Ds, all tunable, all made before the "Kelpie" and "Pro" designations were introduced. Each whistle played slightly differently.)

About finger-spacing, most Low Ds are fairly similar. Here's a lineup that I happened to have a while back

Image

The relative spacing of the lower-hand holes doesn't matter much to me, though I know it's a big issue with many people.

What matters a lot to me is the spacing of the upper-hand holes. I don't know why, but some whistles have a Hole 1 that's placed higher than usual and I have difficulty covering it. The maple-head Reyburn above is like that, with unusually widely-splayed upper-hand holes. The poly-head Reyburn on the other hand has closer-set upper-hand holes than most.

Not pictured above is the Colin Goldie Low D that's currently my main Low D. It has closer-set fingerholes than most Low Ds in both the upper and lower hands, making it very comfortable to play.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 8:21 am 
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Richard, I'm sure you realize that it is back pressure that makes the Mk so air efficient and what makes the B you refer to different on some whistles....Not picking an argument but you are saying that you don't put much stock in back pressure yet you are "referring" to it in you next paragraph. You've experimented with a lot of low D's...You must know that back pressure is relevant.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:13 am 
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whistle1000 wrote:
Richard, I'm sure you realize that it is back pressure that makes the Mk so air efficient and what makes the B you refer to different on some whistles.....


Actually, that is incorrect. A whistle can have both low back pressure and low air requirements. The Walt Sweet Onyx low D is such a whistle. It takes very little air volume to play in the second octave while at the same time having very limited back pressure when compared to say a Goldie or MK.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:23 am 
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Low back pressure is still back pressure :wink:


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:29 am 
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No. Pressure refers to the force needed; whereas air requirements refers to the amount, as in volume.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:51 am 
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Sorry if I am not making sense. Of the three whistles I mentioned, the Goldie and MK pro will play a note for the same length of time, approximately, as the Onyx but they require much more force to get that breath out.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 11:07 am 
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whistle1000 wrote:
You must know that back pressure is relevant.

There is no 'back pressure' in the literal sense or the air would be flowing the opposite way. It's a dubious term for what might better be termed 'resistance'.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 3:25 pm 
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I agree totally Peter...I never quite took to
what it meant until I got my MK and did indeed notice the resistance...I thought to myself that this must be what the folks here mean when they say "back pressure" I never did quite understand the term... Resistance is a much better way to explain it.


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